Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Now, many groups are created online (or members find each other there), but just because we can find each other easier via the Internet doesn’t mean we’re any better at staying together.”

An excerpt from another throwback blog post. Read more about the ups and downs of building Pagan community today.

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It’s been more than a month since Imbolc, so this seems a good time to reshare this post from last year. Enjoy!

Source: • Keeping Brigid after Imbolc

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Good day! Quick question: Do you enjoy the daily oracle card?

If you follow Parting the Mists on Facebook or Twitter, you know that an oracle card is pulled every day. It started as a Samhain season thing, so I picked my beloved Halloween Oracle deck for this. Followers seem to resonate with this deck, but lately I have felt that a change up was needed.

And yes, I had only planned to do the daily card from September through November, but I’ve enjoyed posting the card and would like to continue.

Anyway, here are three decks that feel like good options:

Druid Animal Oracle

Authors Philip Carr-Gomm and Stephanie Carr-Gomm with artists Will Worthington

This was my very first deck when, as a solitary Pagan, I was brave enough to go into a New Age/Witchy shop and buy a deck! Being drawn to Druidry at the time (and that’s never gone away though I went in another direction as a tradition) and having a lifelong love of animals, this was the perfect choice for me.

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Though I don’t consider this a “wintry” deck, I tend to think of it as an all-around good deck, particularly for those with strong animal associations.

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Wildwood Tarot

Authors Mark Ryan and John Matthews with artist Will Worthington

You might notice a trend here – I also love decks with artwork by Will Worthington (I have a third and gave a fourth to a friend). However, this is a tarot deck that’s not like traditional tarot, so I think it would still work well for a daily drawing. It draws much on Celtic myths and achetypes.

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Oracle of Oddities, 2nd edition

Author and designer Claire Goodchild of Black and the Moon

OK, this is brave of me to offer because this deck is pretty new to me (I just won it during the Great October Book Giveaway over at Rue & Hyssop – thanks, Jen!). On top of that, it is quite a unique deck and doesn’t have a book. If there was a short write up with the daily card, I would be the one writing it. This would be new for me, but I also think it would be a good push for my intuition.

Take a gander at these dark and lovely cards. Also stay tuned for a review of this deck soon.

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So which is it? Druid Animal Oracle, Wildwood Tarot, or Oracle of Oddities? Or, do you really want to say with The Halloween Oracle? Please let me know in comments!

Blessings,

Thistle

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Well, it’s long past time that I should have posted something new here – having the WordPress holiday snow over a headline about Lugnassadh is pretty shameful on my part.

OK, moving on.

A location of great interest to most Avalonians – Glastonbury, England – has some news. As mentioned here before, Glastonbury Abbey is raising money for preservation work at the Abbey. While they have held some fundraising events already, the Friends of Glastonbury Abbey is increasing the cost of a season ticket by £1, making an adult season pass £25. They will also be offering lifetime memberships for £300. Click here to read more details.

While I and many of my readers cannot take advantage of these offers, I do hope their efforts to raise money is successful. After all, I know several people – myself included – who would someday like to visit this sacred site. And they need £500,000 to do the preservation work for the Lady Chapel, the North Wall, and the Abbot’s Kitchen.

ADDITION: A friend pointed out that some might wish to contribute to the conservation efforts. If so, check out the Rescue Our Ruins web site.

Coming Soon!

Next week, I’ll kick off with a more serious post about a lesson learned this Samhain season. Then, we’ll switch gears and look at some of my favorite things – just in time for the season of Yule and gift giving.

Bright blessings to you all!

Thistle

 

© 2012 PJ Graham

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Wishing everyone out there a blessed Lughnasadh! This first harvest celebration stems from the festival created by the Irish god Lugh to honor his foster mother, Tailtiu, who died from exhaustion after clearing a forest so the land could be used for agriculture.

When we live in a way that connects us to our food source, this myth works as solid metaphor for the hard work of putting up summer’s bounty to help get through the winter. Growing up, my family depended on our half-acre garden, apple tree, and blackberry brambles to provide us with much of our food supply. And as we spent most of July and early August canning and freezing vegetables and making jelly and applesauce, I can honestly say we were exhausted at this time of year.

But there is also a joy and sense of pride that comes from this work, much like the pride Lugh had in his foster mother. I remember looking at the rows of canned goods in the well house and feeling happy – and secure. Even though I no longer have to work long hours in a garden and kitchen to stay fed through winter, I still enjoy creating things from the harvest.

Homemade preserves are one way to stay connected with the harvest cycle.

So far this year, I’ve put up several batches of black raspberry jelly (courtesy of a juice from a friend), blackberry jelly (including a sage variety), grape jelly, strawberry margarita jam, and “Farmer’s Market Salsa” featuring fresh sweet corn cut from the cob. Not only do these homemade preserves taste much better than the store-bought variety, but making and sharing them helps me feel connected to my recent roots as well as to my ancestors who lived off the land.

So is there something you or your family always did (or still do) to enjoy the fresh fruits and veggies of the harvest? Do you continue these traditions and, if so, how does it make you feel?

‘Parting the Mists’ Turns One-Year Old!

This post also marks the one-year anniversary of this blog! While I didn’t meet my goals of posting twice a week and haven’t posted much in recent months, I look forward to reinvigorating this site.

On the horizon, I see a belated post for the Pagan Values project (which should have been posted in June, oh my) as well as posts digging into the following topics:

  • Examining the history and myths of places believed to be Avalon
  • Energy work, especially as related to healing
  • Creatures of Celtic myth and legend (think faery hounds, unicorns, etc.)
  • Books related to the tradition
  • How the Avalonian, Grail, and Arthurian trads are – or aren’t – connected

Speaking of future posts, is there anything special you’d like to see covered here?

Until next time, bright summer blessings!

Thistle

(Photos courtesy of Morguefile.com)

© 2012 PJ Graham

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Greetings!

This is off topic for us, but I thought reposting this was a good idea in case there are some fellow bloggers – and users of Pinterest and other reposting social media sites – out there.

Click here to read the painful experience of a blogger who used copyrighted images without permission (the blogger was unaware that disclaimers and such saved them from litigation). Note also what the blogger discovered about Pinterest and Tumblr.

This post was brought to my attention on a Linked In writer’s group. Having worked in the publishing field, I already knew that reposting photos and graphics from Google Images and similar sources without permission was a bad idea. Same goes with Photobucket – many of the images posted there are not free for the taking.

That’s why images on this blog are either from sites that offer copyright-free photos (such as those from Morguefile), past-copyright publications (such as those found at Liam’s Pictures from Old Books), or photos that I took or friends allowed me to use. This blog may not be as pretty as some as a result, but I’m drastically reducing my chances of being sued over this blog’s content.

Blog and network safely, my friends!

Thistle

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Have you ever visited the famous ruins of Glastonbury Abbey – or are you saving your nickels and dimes in order to do so? If so, recent news from the Abbey trustees should be of interest.

Abbey director and curator Janet Bell announced that the trustees need to raise 500,000 pounds (just over $790, 000 US dollars at the current exchange rate) for preservation work on the North Wall, the Lady Chapel, and the Abbot’s Kitchen.

Left to right: the Lady Chapel, the Nave, and the Choir. Photo copyright: Jusben, Morguefile.com

Glastonbury Abbey is the ruins of the medieval monastery that claimed to find the remains of King Arthur and Queen Guinevere in the 12th century. Also, the Abbey rests near the Tor, which some consider to have been the Isle of Avalon (including some of us that follow the modern Avalonian, Grail, and Arthurian traditions). The Tor and other nearby locations have historical and spiritual meaning for Pagans and Christians alike. The Abbey and its surrounding landscape is replete with far-reaching myth and folklore.

Aside from historical, mythical, and spiritual reasons behind the project, Philip Welch, editor of the Mid-Somerset Series, says the area needs to sustain tourism at the Abbey since other industries in the area are struggling.

A web site has been set up for the fundraising effort, Rescue Our Ruins, and visitors to the site can learn the specific reasons the funds are needed. On June 1, visitors can visit the Abbey for free in honor of the official launching of the Rescue our Ruins Appeal.

Perhaps making a donation to this fund would be a good charitable act for individual or groups of Avalonians, particularly those who have admired the awe and mystery of the Abbey in person – or who wish to in the future.

Bright blessings!

Thistle

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